Contact Me

helenfisher@sky.com



Hi if you would like me to make any blankets in a particular colour or size etc ,

please just e mail me. I will post
abroad for you. Thank you for
taking the time to stop by!

All hand made for you , by myself in Wales xx





Sunday, 13 April 2014

http://www.juiceplus.co.uk/en-gb/home.html and crochet "cath Kidston "style

Morning everyone ! I apologise now for now for not getting back in touch with u all on time lately . Life has been so hectic . Between working full time and everything else that as been going on .

    Hope i find you all well and please keep sending me any e mails , i really do still love receiving them .
 Been a really busy day here , three beds all washed and made back up and a little ironing done but not one of my favourite pastimes !
                                Crochering another " Cath Kisdton " type cushion , pattern made up in my head !
 


  Anyway i on a mission to get healthy as i am going be the grand old age of   50 , later in this year !


I have heard so many good things about this Juiceplus  http://www.juiceplus.co.uk/en-gb/home.html
     so if anyone wants to join my and get healthy for the summer , please contact me and we will go on this journey together !   Catch u soon and wish me luck x

Friday, 4 April 2014

Hi , everyone , well that is the end of tax year 2013/14 . Been a very busy day !  Hope u all like my new Purple Girly Crochet Cushion cover  xxx

Saturday, 29 March 2014

Monday, 21 October 2013

PLEASE SAY A PRAY FOR THESE FAMILIES TONIGHT .

  Photo: 21st October.

At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21st 1966, a waste tip slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan.  It first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants.  At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly.  The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been stolen. Down in the village, everybody heard the noise, but because of a thick fog, nobody saw anything.

Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old at the school, remembered:

"It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes."
The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Hundreds of people stopped what they were doing, threw a shovel in the car, and drove to Aberfan to try and help with the rescue. It was futile; the untrained rescuers merely got in the way of the trained rescue teams. Nobody was rescued alive after 11am on the day of the disaster, but it was nearly a week before all the bodies were recovered.  In total 144 people died in the Aberfan disaster: 116 of them were school children.  About half of the children at Pantglas Junior School, and five of their teachers, were killed.

For 50 years up to 1966, millions of cubic metres of excavated mining debris from the National Coal Board's Merthyr Vale Colliery was deposited on the side of Mynydd Merthyr, directly above the village of Aberfan. Huge piles, or 'tips', of loose rock and mining spoil had been built up over a layer of highly porous sandstone that contained numerous underground springs and several tips had been built up directly over these springs. Although local authorities had raised specific concerns in 1963 about spoil being tipped on the mountain above the village primary school, these were largely ignored by the NCB's area management.  Early on the morning of Friday, 21 October 1966, after several days of heavy rain, a subsidence of about 3–6 metres occurred on the upper flank of colliery waste tip No. 7. At 9:15 a.m. more than 150,000 cubic metres of water-saturated debris broke away and flowed downhill at high speed.

On 26 October 1966, the Secretary of State for Wales appointed a tribunal to inquire into the causes of and circumstances relating to the Aberfan disaster, chaired by Welsh barrister and Privy Councillor Lord Justice Edmund Davies.

The Tribunal's report, found that

*  The blame for the disaster rested entirely with the National Coal Board, and that the basic cause was the NCB's "total absence of a tipping policy"

*  Repeated warnings about the dangerous condition of the tip had been ignored, and that colliery engineers at all levels had concentrated only on conditions underground. 

*  The tips had never been surveyed, and right up to the time of the landslide they were continuously being added to in a chaotic and unplanned manner. The disregard of the NCB and the colliery staff for the unstable geological conditions and its failure to act after previous smaller slides were found to have been major factors that contributed to the catastrophe.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aberfan_disaster21st October.

At 9.15 am on Friday, October 21st 1966, a waste tip slid down a mountainside into the mining village of Aberfan. It first destroyed a farm cottage in its path, killing all the occupants. At Pantglas Junior School, just below, the children had just returned to their classes after singing All Things Bright and Beautiful at their assembly. The tipping gang up the mountain had seen the slide start, but could not raise the alarm because their telephone cable had been stolen. Down in the village, everybody heard the noise, but because of a thick fog, nobody saw anything.

Gaynor Minett, an eight-year-old at the school, remembered:

"It was a tremendous rumbling sound and all the school went dead. You could hear a pin drop. Everyone just froze in their seats. I just managed to get up and I reached the end of my desk when the sound got louder and nearer, until I could see the black out of the window. I can't remember any more but I woke up to find that a horrible nightmare had just begun in front of my eyes."
The slide engulfed the school and about 20 houses in the village before coming to rest. Hundreds of people stopped what they were doing, threw a shovel in the car, and drove to Aberfan to try and help with the rescue. It was futile; the untrained rescuers merely got in the way of the trained rescue teams. Nobody was rescued alive after 11am on the day of the disaster, but it was nearly a week before all the bodies were recovered. In total 144 people died in the Aberfan disaster: 116 of them were school children. About half of the children at Pantglas Junior School, and five of their teachers, were killed.

For 50 years up to 1966, millions of cubic metres of excavated mining debris from the National Coal Board's Merthyr Vale Colliery was deposited on the side of Mynydd Merthyr, directly above the village of Aberfan. Huge piles, or 'tips', of loose rock and mining spoil had been built up over a layer of highly porous sandstone that contained numerous underground springs and several tips had been built up directly over these springs. Although local authorities had raised specific concerns in 1963 about spoil being tipped on the mountain above the village primary school, these were largely ignored by the NCB's area management. Early on the morning of Friday, 21 October 1966, after several days of heavy rain, a subsidence of about 3–6 metres occurred on the upper flank of colliery waste tip No. 7. At 9:15 a.m. more than 150,000 cubic metres of water-saturated debris broke away and flowed downhill at high speed.

On 26 October 1966, the Secretary of State for Wales appointed a tribunal to inquire into the causes of and circumstances relating to the Aberfan disaster, chaired by Welsh barrister and Privy Councillor Lord Justice Edmund Davies.

The Tribunal's report, found that

* The blame for the disaster rested entirely with the National Coal Board, and that the basic cause was the NCB's "total absence of a tipping policy"

* Repeated warnings about the dangerous condition of the tip had been ignored, and that colliery engineers at all levels had concentrated only on conditions underground.

* The tips had never been surveyed, and right up to the time of the landslide they were continuously being added to in a chaotic and unplanned manner. The disregard of the NCB and the colliery staff for the unstable geological conditions and its failure to act after previous smaller slides were found to have been major factors that contributed to the catastrophe.